The Graduate Center - City University of New York

William S. Walsh, ed., Abraham Lincoln and the London Punch: Cartoons, Comments and Poems, Published in The London Charivari during the American Civil War (1909)

England’s famous satirical weekly, Punch, or the London Charivari, inaugurated in 1841, was renowned for its political cartoons and occasionally commented on American politics—especially the “peculiar institution” of slavery—throughout its twenty year publication. Although critical of slavery, once the Civil war began the magazine sympathized with the Confederacy and viewed the Union cause with hostility and suspicion. Its leading cartoonist John Tenniel often transposed those sentiments into the very figure of Abraham Lincoln, who under the Punch artist’s pen became a grotesque-looking, duplicitous, tyrannical, hypocritical, incompetent, crude, and uncaring caricature. Only with the war’s end and Lincoln’s assassination did the magazine relent. This 1909 book contains all of the Punch cartoons, as well as commentary and poems, pertaining to the American Civil War.

Creator: William S. Walsh, ed.

Date: 1909

Publisher: Abraham Lincoln and the London Punch: Cartoons, Comments and Poems, Published in The London Charivari during the American Civil War - New York: Moffat, Yard and Company

Source: Accessed via Internet Archive: http://archive.org/details/abrahamlincolnth00walsrich